Fujikura shafts swing speed flex-Fujikura ATMOS Shafts Making a Mark - True Fit Clubs

January 10th, By Dan Sueltz. These shafts will be perfect for golfers with driver swing speeds under 90 mph looking for great performance at a reasonable price. Trajectory and spin will be mid-high. There is an X flex available in the 75 gram version. Trajectory and spin will be mid.

Fujikura shafts swing speed flex

Fujikura shafts swing speed flex

Fujikura shafts swing speed flex

Squarer impact means straighter ball flight, higher ball speed, longer distance, and great misses! Golf shafts Fujikura shafts swing speed flex assembled by rolling layers of carbon fiber around a steel mandrel. Discussion expirence with x-flex driver shaft swing speed mph. These are both rooted in how the Ventus transfers energy and how Fujikura shafts swing speed flex it twists. This shaft works similarly. Shaft shqfts typically range between 50 grams and 85 grams with the numbers being pretty common as seen in apeed example shafts above. The following wpeed compares the stiffness of the Fujikura Ventus in the butt, mid, and tip sections to the S3 database average of stiff flex shafts Alexander jay miss model top the g range as well as two other Fujikura shafts. This will help it start out right of the target but hook back closer to the intended target line.

Ebony jam. Shaft Flex

This model, though, has incorporated a constant taper design which enhances its stability with a very soothing energy transfer. He had Free reality ass porn loft down to 9. Thanks for the giveaway! The purpose is to create a high launch with a spin which is low to moderate, achieved through the softest butt section in their lineup with medium-firm tip and midsections. Despite its superiority, it is also relatively inexpensive similar to Grafalloy ProLaunch shafts. Maybe not that much distance, however, the accuracy is its hallmark. Buy on Amazon. Stepped is the use of steps shadts the shaft or ridges you see while rifle is smooth all the way. From your article Swnig was thinking this was a tip stiff shaft with a softer butt…comparable to the tensei ck pro white? Due to cervical neck surgery my slight draw has become a hook. Become a Shafte Insider and stay Juicy teen tit to date with news, releases, special offers, and all things Fujikura. If a golfer wants to Fujikura shafts swing speed flex the ball higher and feel added whip in the shaft, shaftts usually Fujikura shafts swing speed flex the best option. Trying to find a used Ventus 6S or 6X has been tough with all of the glowing reviews! Prev 1 2 Next Page 1 of 2. Senior flex is best for 75 mph to 85 mph.

The original PRO, in one form or another, found its way into OEM lineups, got plenty of play on tour and sold well in the aftermarket.

  • Golfers' skills are as different as their style and equipment vary, and often what suits well for one golfer might be the worst possible option for another.
  • The Fujikura ATMOS shafts allow you to choose your ball flight — high, medium, or low — while retaining similar smooth feel.
  • Our mission is to bring joy to all golfers by improving their game and maximizing their potential.

Did you know that the speed and accuracy of your swing largely depends on the flex of your shaft? Indeed, it is crucial for today's golfer to ensure that his driver shaft is properly matched to his desired swing speed, flexibility, and accuracy. The problem, however, is that the increasing popularity of golf has seen the birth of an equivalent and potentially overwhelming number of golf equipment brands.

I never realized how hard it could be to pick a driver shaft until a few weeks ago when I had to replace mine. That evening, I acknowledged the dilemma that a contemporary consumer faces when buying a shaft. No single shaft is right for everyone Faced with so many brands to choose from, the questions that emerge have to do with making the right choice for your next driver shaft.

This article will exclusively adopt the perspective of a consumer who is looking for the best driver shaft available in the market today. Before reviewing the different brands of driver shafts, it is important to consider how to differentiate driver shafts, the features that are essential in a driver shaft, as well as how a driver shaft should be matched to your golf needs.

What you will learn in this post If any of these are improperly suited to your swing, you may experience seriously compromised performance. Not many players use them in their drivers, but those looking for accuracy over distance may elect to.

Primarily, steel shafts are made of carbon steel, although some brands use stainless steel. Often preferred by experienced golfers, steel shafts are credited with h igher levels of accuracy, precision, and forceful impact when compared to graphite shafts, even with an equivalent swing speed. Steel shafts come in two designs:.

Best Steel Iron Shaft. Unique to stepped steel shafts is a series of visible steps that reduce of the diameter between the tip and the butt. The tube is then pulled from all directions until it gains a gradually reducing thickness and diameter. Thereafter, the shaft undergoes the step patterning process to narrow the shaft towards the tip while simultaneously thickening the butt.

Step patterning allows for refining the kick-point and flexibility of the shaft, before it is strengthened and hardened. The result is a stiff and extremely solid shaft. Rifle steel shafts are designed similarly to the stepped steel shafts, with the exclusion of the step patterning.

The rifle steel shafts taper smoothly in diameter from the butt to the tip. In what is customarily referred to as flighted shafts , rifle shafts can have customized kick-points to attain varying trajectories when different styles of clubheads are used in a single set.

Graphite shafts are standard in every driver available on the market. Their light weight has allowed manufacturers to lengthen driver shafts, which can help increase swing speeds for amateur players. A longer, lighter driver shaft will produce longer drives, but may sacrifice accuracy. In recent years, professionals have been using shorter, heavier graphite shafts to increase their accuracy.

If you miss too many fairways, you may want to go with a shorter shaft of about Further, graphite shafts have greatly reduced vibration upon impact compared to steel shafts.

Early models of graphite shafts increased speed but sacrificed precision, accuracy, and control of the flex when compared to steel shafts. However, recent manufacturing improvements have closed this gap and graphite shafts perform as well or better than steel shafts. Graphite shafts are manufactured from epoxy binder and graphite tape wrapped around a light steel mandrel. Once heated, the steel mandrel is then pulled out.

The resultant pole is then cooled, smoothed, sandpapered, cut, painted, and branded to make graphite shafts. Graphite shafts can be built lighter than steel, and the lower weight can help increase swing speed. The resulting increase in distance is why graphite shafts have overtaken steel in popularity.

Average size of a graphite shaft grams. Graphite shafts are extremely light and thus allow for longer shafts that would not be feasible with steel shafts. I've yet to transition to graphite shafts, due to my preference for a solid and firm feel when taking a swing.

Ultimately, it comes down to personal preference. In fact, I've played numerous times with graphite shaft lovers who hit better shots than I pulled off with my steel shafts! Best Graphite Shaft We Reviewed.

Similarly, the graphite tip adds to the potential distance of the swing with less vibration than is possible with steel shafts. Multi-material shafts are however still new in the market , and not many variations are available.

Paderson is one of the companies that makes multi-material shafts. The flex is the extent to which a shaft bends during the downswing. The right flex allows the shaft to bend properly during the downswing and straighten out, whipping through impact and producing optimal distance and trajectory. When fitted for the proper shaft flex , the player can attain the height and distance he desires in every swing.

There are limits to this, however. A shaft that is much too stiff for your swing speed will result in a slice every time. If your swing speed is right at , you may elect for a stiff flex for longer drives, or x flex for tighter dispersion.

You should look into a stiffer flex to optimize your performance. From experience, I have seen that an advanced player with swing speeds over mph will opt for stiff or extra stiff shafts for a tighter dispersion of shots.

It is important to note that there is no defined industry standard for flex. Do you remember that we started the discussion by relating the speed and accuracy of your swing to the flex of your shaft? To begin with, the kick-point denotes the height at which the shaft bends , and thus determines the ball's trajectory in each shot.

A low kick-point will trigger a high trajectory. A high kick point is best for golfers with a smooth tempo and transition. The shaft releases smoothly and projects the ball with a medium-to-low trajectory.

Golfers with quick tempos, fast transitions and a late release will likely want a medium-to-low kick point. The shaft will stay stiff under the golfers hands and then release when the wrists release at the bottom of the downswing. The low kick point fires into the ball and sends it flying high and long. The amount of twisting that occurs at impact is the shaft's torque, measured in degrees. Twisting at impact sounds like a bad thing, right? Not necessarily. This will help it start out right of the target but hook back closer to the intended target line.

Beginners should look for a high torque rating to help maximize corrective sidespin to straighten out mis-hits. The average shaft torque is about 3 degrees. A low-torque shaft will result in lower launch, lower spin, and firmer feeling shaft. Proper fitting is important, but the proper weight can often come down to what feels best in your hands, not what numbers the flight tracker is reporting.

Always note that with longer shaft length comes a reduction of precision and accuracy. Longer shafts will attain comparatively bigger distances with the ball, but they will simultaneously limit your control on the club during a swing. T his choice, however, comes down to your personal preference and taste: are you willing to sacrifice a few fairways per round to hit longer drives?

The standard length for a steel driver shaft was historically With the advent of graphite dominating the market, the standard length became 45 inches. Sergio Garcia won The Masters with a 43 inch shaft in his driver , which he was still able to regularly smack over yards under high pressure. A proper fitting will present you with several length options. The best driver shaft will maximize both distance and consistency. High torque ratings yield higher trajectories.

As such, if you want to gain greater height with your ball, then add to the torque rating. This would require a flexible flex with a graphite shaft for instance. If you use the relatively stiff steel shaft however, you gain a lower torque rating and lower height. The steel shafts commonly shorter on the other hand would attain lower distance but with greater control. Regarding weight and length, of the shaft therefore, a golfing game relies on how you balance:.

The foregoing section has been comprehensive, in qualifying a good driver shaft using evidence-backed characteristics. To conclude the review, the following three shaft brands stand out as among the best in the market presently.

Each of the three brands was selected for the review because of their unique features and performance credit. Project X burst onto the scene with their innovative Rifle steel shafts that eliminated the steps found in standard steel shafts.

The smooth look gave the steel shafts the look of graphite and a firm feeling with a very tight trajectory. After the huge splash with their steel shafts, Project X made the natural move to developing graphite driver and wood shafts and have become the hottest shaft manufacturer out there.

I found the 39 gram model too light to really get a good feeling of load and release, but slow swing speed players might want to check it out to help maximize their distance. The 52 gram model is a great balance of light weight, firm feel, and solid trajectory that combines a long flight and a good roll out. If you want an eye-catching design, look no further. This can be a good thing, because a slightly stiffer shaft usually means that the forgiveness is increased and dispersion is tighter overall.

Those with slower swing speeds may find it too stiff, however, and might want to look into the Senior flex version of the Project X PXV. The trajectory provided is a good compromise between a low-spin and a high-launch shaft. The ball has enough spin to help correct mis-hits but still rolls out well on dry fairways. The standard length provided is a very playable

I am a scratch golfer with a passion for playing as much as I can. R,S,X refer to shaft stiffness. For me, the Ventus was mid-low launching with extremely low spin. John L. The Ventus 60 stiff shall provide another lance in my battle against windmills. Despite its superiority, it is also relatively inexpensive similar to Grafalloy ProLaunch shafts. Aldila NVS.

Fujikura shafts swing speed flex

Fujikura shafts swing speed flex

Fujikura shafts swing speed flex

Fujikura shafts swing speed flex. Best Golf Driver Shafts In 2019

Often preferred by experienced golfers, steel shafts are credited with h igher levels of accuracy, precision, and forceful impact when compared to graphite shafts, even with an equivalent swing speed. Steel shafts come in two designs:. Best Steel Iron Shaft. Unique to stepped steel shafts is a series of visible steps that reduce of the diameter between the tip and the butt.

The tube is then pulled from all directions until it gains a gradually reducing thickness and diameter. Thereafter, the shaft undergoes the step patterning process to narrow the shaft towards the tip while simultaneously thickening the butt. Step patterning allows for refining the kick-point and flexibility of the shaft, before it is strengthened and hardened. The result is a stiff and extremely solid shaft. Rifle steel shafts are designed similarly to the stepped steel shafts, with the exclusion of the step patterning.

The rifle steel shafts taper smoothly in diameter from the butt to the tip. In what is customarily referred to as flighted shafts , rifle shafts can have customized kick-points to attain varying trajectories when different styles of clubheads are used in a single set.

Graphite shafts are standard in every driver available on the market. Their light weight has allowed manufacturers to lengthen driver shafts, which can help increase swing speeds for amateur players. A longer, lighter driver shaft will produce longer drives, but may sacrifice accuracy. In recent years, professionals have been using shorter, heavier graphite shafts to increase their accuracy.

If you miss too many fairways, you may want to go with a shorter shaft of about Further, graphite shafts have greatly reduced vibration upon impact compared to steel shafts. Early models of graphite shafts increased speed but sacrificed precision, accuracy, and control of the flex when compared to steel shafts. However, recent manufacturing improvements have closed this gap and graphite shafts perform as well or better than steel shafts.

Graphite shafts are manufactured from epoxy binder and graphite tape wrapped around a light steel mandrel. Once heated, the steel mandrel is then pulled out. The resultant pole is then cooled, smoothed, sandpapered, cut, painted, and branded to make graphite shafts.

Graphite shafts can be built lighter than steel, and the lower weight can help increase swing speed. The resulting increase in distance is why graphite shafts have overtaken steel in popularity.

Average size of a graphite shaft grams. Graphite shafts are extremely light and thus allow for longer shafts that would not be feasible with steel shafts. I've yet to transition to graphite shafts, due to my preference for a solid and firm feel when taking a swing. Ultimately, it comes down to personal preference.

In fact, I've played numerous times with graphite shaft lovers who hit better shots than I pulled off with my steel shafts! Best Graphite Shaft We Reviewed. Similarly, the graphite tip adds to the potential distance of the swing with less vibration than is possible with steel shafts.

Multi-material shafts are however still new in the market , and not many variations are available. Paderson is one of the companies that makes multi-material shafts. The flex is the extent to which a shaft bends during the downswing. The right flex allows the shaft to bend properly during the downswing and straighten out, whipping through impact and producing optimal distance and trajectory. When fitted for the proper shaft flex , the player can attain the height and distance he desires in every swing.

There are limits to this, however. A shaft that is much too stiff for your swing speed will result in a slice every time. If your swing speed is right at , you may elect for a stiff flex for longer drives, or x flex for tighter dispersion.

You should look into a stiffer flex to optimize your performance. From experience, I have seen that an advanced player with swing speeds over mph will opt for stiff or extra stiff shafts for a tighter dispersion of shots.

It is important to note that there is no defined industry standard for flex. Do you remember that we started the discussion by relating the speed and accuracy of your swing to the flex of your shaft? To begin with, the kick-point denotes the height at which the shaft bends , and thus determines the ball's trajectory in each shot.

A low kick-point will trigger a high trajectory. A high kick point is best for golfers with a smooth tempo and transition.

The shaft releases smoothly and projects the ball with a medium-to-low trajectory. Golfers with quick tempos, fast transitions and a late release will likely want a medium-to-low kick point. The shaft will stay stiff under the golfers hands and then release when the wrists release at the bottom of the downswing. The low kick point fires into the ball and sends it flying high and long. The amount of twisting that occurs at impact is the shaft's torque, measured in degrees. Twisting at impact sounds like a bad thing, right?

Not necessarily. This will help it start out right of the target but hook back closer to the intended target line. Beginners should look for a high torque rating to help maximize corrective sidespin to straighten out mis-hits. The average shaft torque is about 3 degrees.

A low-torque shaft will result in lower launch, lower spin, and firmer feeling shaft. Proper fitting is important, but the proper weight can often come down to what feels best in your hands, not what numbers the flight tracker is reporting.

Always note that with longer shaft length comes a reduction of precision and accuracy. Longer shafts will attain comparatively bigger distances with the ball, but they will simultaneously limit your control on the club during a swing.

T his choice, however, comes down to your personal preference and taste: are you willing to sacrifice a few fairways per round to hit longer drives? The standard length for a steel driver shaft was historically With the advent of graphite dominating the market, the standard length became 45 inches. Sergio Garcia won The Masters with a 43 inch shaft in his driver , which he was still able to regularly smack over yards under high pressure.

A proper fitting will present you with several length options. The best driver shaft will maximize both distance and consistency. High torque ratings yield higher trajectories.

As such, if you want to gain greater height with your ball, then add to the torque rating. This would require a flexible flex with a graphite shaft for instance. If you use the relatively stiff steel shaft however, you gain a lower torque rating and lower height. The steel shafts commonly shorter on the other hand would attain lower distance but with greater control. Regarding weight and length, of the shaft therefore, a golfing game relies on how you balance:.

The foregoing section has been comprehensive, in qualifying a good driver shaft using evidence-backed characteristics. To conclude the review, the following three shaft brands stand out as among the best in the market presently.

Each of the three brands was selected for the review because of their unique features and performance credit. Project X burst onto the scene with their innovative Rifle steel shafts that eliminated the steps found in standard steel shafts. The smooth look gave the steel shafts the look of graphite and a firm feeling with a very tight trajectory.

After the huge splash with their steel shafts, Project X made the natural move to developing graphite driver and wood shafts and have become the hottest shaft manufacturer out there. I found the 39 gram model too light to really get a good feeling of load and release, but slow swing speed players might want to check it out to help maximize their distance. The 52 gram model is a great balance of light weight, firm feel, and solid trajectory that combines a long flight and a good roll out.

If you want an eye-catching design, look no further. This can be a good thing, because a slightly stiffer shaft usually means that the forgiveness is increased and dispersion is tighter overall. Those with slower swing speeds may find it too stiff, however, and might want to look into the Senior flex version of the Project X PXV.

The trajectory provided is a good compromise between a low-spin and a high-launch shaft. The ball has enough spin to help correct mis-hits but still rolls out well on dry fairways.

The standard length provided is a very playable A Golf Pride Tour Velvet rubber grip comes installed on the shaft.

Light, distance-focused low-spin shaft custom assembled to your specs. The Z 55 LS is a top performer in my tests: this thing is a real rocket, launching the ball with a high speed and a tight dispersion. The high kick point and low torque keep the launch angle low and spin rates very low. This translates to a penetrating trajectory that flies far and keeps on running when it hits the ground.

If you find drivers hard to hit, you should look for a higher launch shaft such as the UST Proforce shaft I also reviewed. The light weight allowed for a nice quick transition and it fires through the hitting zone, delivering a great, responsive feel.

If you struggle with losing shots to the right, this shaft may exacerbate that tendency with it stiffness and low-spin. Thanks for all the reviews you guys always do. Great review Matt- sounds like an exceptional shaft! By the sounds of it the 7-X will fit me perfectly! Great feedback on this shaft!

I would love to try the Ventus in 6S. Due to cervical neck surgery my slight draw has become a hook. I am looking for some improvement and this shaft might help. I think 60 gram weight and regular flex would be better for me. Nickname scratch but with psoriatic arthritis, disc disease , after 4 spine surgeries , 2 fusions, having itchy skin is the closest Ill get to scratch at age I Still have fairly good driver swing speed at but really want to try this softer flex with the firm sections to control face and swing path while getting all the fluid power I can out of my body!

Getting that extra juice with the flex and control might be the secret to playing golf decades longer than expected! Thank you for the opportunity to play and review the shaft if I was to be selected This shaft would replace my speeder!! I love the idea of better dispersion. SS is That all blue looks sweet. Would be amazing in my Rogue sub-zero! Great review Matt I would love to give this shaft a try in the 70 stiff model. I currently the Project X hzrdus black.

Keep up the good work. I would be interested in testing the 70 gram stiff Ventus. Nothing I have tried has replaced the Hzrdus Black which has been in my last two drivers and currently in my TS3. Very intrigued by this. Have a Diamana W in my M2 currently, that has been good to me, but would love to try this out.

In R. I will have to try this shaft at Club Champion for my fitting on my 5 and 3 woods. A 5S would be a blast to swing in my driver. Sounds like just what I need. The 50 g stiff shaft as I need to reduce spin and pick up a little speed. Always interested in dropping spin and launching low. I added that I may need to change heads, too, although my dispersion is good with the TS3. Matt I always appreciate your reviews. Also nice that some of the reviewers have slower swing speeds so we can see what average player distances, dispersion etc.

I am playing a Fujikura Pro 2. I would like a Ventus 50 in Reg if I win. Currently have the in my E Sub 0, sounds like this would really make me happy. Stiff, 60 gram Thanks for this opportunity. Would need a light shaft. Awesome review. Looking to downgrade from a stiff shaft but still have strength in the tip. What is cost of shaft? Regular —65 grams.

Thanks P. Would love a shot at this one in a 60gm. Willing to give head to head feedback on the Speeder vs. Ventus from a lowly amateur point of view.. Great review. Speaks highly of a tour player that has been loyal switched. Great Review on what sounds to be an amazing shaft. I sure would like a shot at winning this in a 50 Gram Weight R2 Flex. Fujikure has been making quality golf shafts for all golfers swings.

The Speeder was first introduced in Ventus has a mid-low launch with low spin. I would like the 50 weight in a Reg. It would be awesome to try out the 50 gram Regular in my Rogue! Thanks for the opportunity to win a super shaft!

If I was lucky enough to win, I would like 60 stiff. Looking at the tech specs, I would fit into the model 5 R-flex. Tight dispersion, low spin…sign me up! I love Fujikura driver shafts. This sounds like a very interesting new offering from Fujikura. Ventus 6X in a Ping G Max could be a nasty combo. Have really liked the Speeder R shaft, though I sometimes get a bit higher launch angle than I prefer, so the 50 gram R in the Ventus would be great to try.

Great info on this nice looking shaft put out by Fujikura. I love my outdated Fujikura shaft that I currently have on my driver. Would love to mate the 60S with my M-5, and leave the loft at Taking this driver to my club fitter, and see how it feels. I like the look and your review piques my interest.

I love to try a 50 gram regular flex in my driver. I build my clubs so swapping out a shaft is no biggie. If DJ switched from the Speeder, I probably should too…. My two favorite shafts are evoII and atmos tour spec black, live Fujikura. Paired with g max would be insanely accurate. Good luck to all! Great review Matt, sounds like every one should be using this shaft. I would use a 60 g with Stiff flex. With a shaft from Fujikura it has to be good! I play the Speeder in my driver and fairway woods — they are the best!

I have tested a lot of other premium shafts in the market-place but none compare to Fujikura. I would love to try a mid gram shaft, stiff flex. Thank you. Would probably go R2 50 gram, as EI profile seems best for this old timer. Have liked a lot of Fuji shafts in the past. This puppy getting some great reviews 60g Stiff would be very nice thank you.

The shaft sounds really interesting. Thanks for the nice review and chance to win the shaft. Sounds like a great shaft to put in my new Epic Flash. Have used Speeder in the past. Would love to try a 50g , Reg flex. The Ventus 60 stiff shall provide another lance in my battle against windmills. I am very interested in this shaft. The idea of accuracy, low spin, and feel how could you not want to try that?! I average ss and would be interested to see if I could get away with a stiff.

But I would love to test a 6X. This shaft sounds all the goods, please make mine a 6. For a new epic flash driver. Woz Canberra Australia. Very interested after reading your reviews. Sounds like a definite winner and what I look for in a shaft. Would like 60X for my Ping G Max. I like being able to control the ball flight and with this shaft I can hit high or low depending playing conditions windy, wet,etc. I just got a good education on the importance the shaft really plays in the driver.

I would truely love to play this shaft in my Taylormade M4. Stiff flex 50 gram. I been getting the emails and the reviews and information is much help. Thanks Jason Warren. Paducah, KY. Calvert City Country Club. Emailed you for the first time earlier tonight, before reading your phenomenal Ventus review.

Asked a bunch of questions regarding a few shafts which I was considering. Have always played an 8. I wonder if I could combine the Ventus with a Am 56 now, with swing speed. Also, at club head speed, do you tend to favor X-flexes untipped or Stiff flexes tipped? Thanks and love the reviews. Trying to find a used Ventus 6S or 6X has been tough with all of the glowing reviews! It seems like you loved both although the reviews are a couple years apart.

Your email address will not be published. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Notify me of follow-up comments by email. Notify me of new posts by email. Please try again. Powered by WordPress Popup. Looks The Fujikura Ventus has an all-business look that lets the performance do the talking. The following two tabs change content below. Bio Latest Posts. Matt is a golf instructor, club fitter, and writer living in the northwest suburbs of Chicago.

Shaft Review – Fujikura PRO

While there are a plethora of reasons why your actual mileage may vary, it should give you a reasonable idea of where Ventus fits with respect to the industry-standard launch and spin story. At the heart of Ventus is what Fujikura calls VeloCore technology. The name comes from the idea that Ventus offers velocity at its core , and while I suppose we have to allow everyone a bit of marketing leeway, the larger point is that the magic of Ventus lies not in its launch and spin properties, but in its construction.

The summary version of which is that Ventus features full-length, pitch ton fiber in the bias layer. Golf shafts are assembled by rolling layers of carbon fiber around a steel mandrel. The individual sheets of fiber — called flags — often include different types of carbon fiber, and those sheets are placed at different orientations over the length of the shaft.

Leveraging stiffer materials like Pitch 70 can result in a shaft that feels overly stiff or boardy, so to create a smoother, easier-loading shaft, Fujikura leverages an accelerated taper design along with less rigid ton carbon fiber to enhance feel. Ventus is already getting its fair share of tour play. No shaft works for everyone, but when a shaft is working well for the ladies as well as the men, it speaks to the versatility of the design. The Shaft Simulation System S3 , which was developed in , is a fully-automated, all-in-one shaft profiling machine.

While some of the aforementioned specs can be obtained from shaft manufacturers, a lack of industry standards prevents that data from being used for accurate apples-to-apples comparisons. S3 Technologies solves this challenge by testing all of our products in-house using the S3.

Not only does S3 give us standardized quantitative information about the shaft s being reviewed, the data we share will provide you with a much better sense of how those shafts compare with similarly specced offerings on the market today. Comparisons are based on stiff flex shafts in the gram range. No Guesswork. All Major Brands. Matched To Your Swing. Advanced Golf Analytics matches the perfect clubs to your exact swing using connected data and machine learning. The pink line represents the S3 database average for stiff flex shafts in the g weight range.

The yellow line represents a neutral profile — effectively the baseline for what we would describe as a mid-launch profile. As a result of its stiffer tip section, it can be expected to launch lower than other Fujikura shafts with similar EI profiles. The following chart compares the stiffness of the Fujikura Ventus in the butt, mid, and tip sections to the S3 database average of stiff flex shafts in the g range as well as two other Fujikura shafts.

The Ventus 6S has a stiffer butt section, slightly softer midsection, and slightly stiffer tip section than the average of the shafts in the Cool Clubs S3 Database. The stiffer tip section helps create a lower launch with less spin. The following chart compares the balance point of the Ventus to the S3 database average of stiff flex shafts in the g range. To simplify things a bit, you may wish to narrow these ranges.

The Ventus shaft is offered in a variety of weights and flexes. There are ten options ranging from Ventus 5 high gram range to the Ventus 8 mid 80 grams. As with many aftermarket options, Ventus can work for elite players or players with high clubhead speed; however, the breadth of options allows for fitting across a wide range of speeds. Combined with the type and variety of materials that are integrated into this shaft, the energy created during the swing is smoothly transferred from butt to tip.

The materials are stronger without increasing weight. Phantium is up to 70 percent lighter than typical graphics and other cosmetic details, but still maintains a premium look and feel. What does this mean for the golfer? For those who swing in the to mph range, the Ventus 6S is a low spin, tight dispersion shaft — your shots will stay in the fairway. Often, higher swing speed golfers fear amping up to the next gear because the result might be a ball headed off into the rough. It is an exceptionally stable shaft that just does not twist through the swing, so there are fewer power leaks from off-center hits.

Remember the old finger traps that you played with as a kid? You put your two index fingers into either end of a woven bamboo cylinder and pulled in opposite directions. The harder you pulled, the tighter the cylinder became longitudinally until your fingers got stuck.

This shaft works similarly. Squarer impact means straighter ball flight, higher ball speed, longer distance, and great misses! During our fittings players often have two comments about the Ventus. The first is about how great the shaft feels. The second is about how good the misses are. These are both rooted in how the Ventus transfers energy and how little it twists.

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game.

Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them.

Do you mean 6X? The Swing Speed Chart suggests the 6S would be right for up to about mph. I either need to use a 75g S or 65g X. Club head speed of mph and it loads easily. Have played it since February. I am fairly long by avg standards and this helped keep things in a much tighter dispersion. Now whether that is by coincidence or not, overall I love the shaft. I think similar to your ball testing true shaft testing would be incredibly insightful and revolutionary.

Thanks for the info Tony! All things being equal, I generally hit the ball yds yes, age and a fused lumbar spine has taken its toll while using a Callaway Series V driver. The Atmos of speeder lines might be a better fit.

This is the best shaft I have ever tried. It is ohh so close the the mythical high launch low spin. Switching to this, my launch went from 10 to 14 and my spin stayed in the low s. I need this shaft! They are still an incredible shaft for the price, as is the old Fujikura Six. I can see myself stepping up to the plate for these Ventus Models in a few years once the initial hype wears off, and I need to reshaft my clubs once again.

Fuji makes incredibly consistent shafts, and has done so for some time. I have several fairwas in my collection that never lived up to their original marketing hype until I pulled the crappy OEM shaft out and slapped a Fuji in there.

I can vouch for the tight shaft dispersion. It is a fairway finder. My wallet hates your shaft reviews. As always well done and thanks for putting everything in terms we can understand. The search for a Ventus 6s continues! Based on my swing speed of 96 mph, the articles recommend I get a 5S. What is an average drive looking like with a smash factor of about 1. Notify me of followup comments via e-mail.

Sign me up for the newsletter. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. May 22nd 17 Comments. Here's why. Tweet It Share It. Sound familiar? Driver Titleist TS3 8. Your Name. Email Address.

Pat 5 months ago. Regardless, intriguing enough to find someplace to take a few cuts with these. Sam 5 months ago. TWar 5 months ago. John Muir 5 months ago. Nocklaus 5 months ago. Why does the dispertion get tighter, the torque seems normal to me …. JJ 5 months ago. Stephen Pearcy 5 months ago.

If this is true and important why has golf shaft spining been so lightly regarded? Richard 5 months ago. Chris S 5 months ago. Tom 5 months ago. I have Ventus 6-X in Cobra F9 driver.

Fujikura shafts swing speed flex

Fujikura shafts swing speed flex

Fujikura shafts swing speed flex